Question: Why Do Millennials Say No Worries?

Is saying no worries rude?

For the receiver of an apology to reject it or dismiss the request for forgiveness is impolite.

One might think that responding with a casual “no worries,” could assuage the guilt of the person in the wrong..

Can I say no worries to thanks?

It seems that “you’re welcome” has become so passé, so 1990s. In “hip-speak” the appropriate response to “thank you” is “yup,” “no problem,” or “no worries.” God-forbid that we should acknowledge the gratitude that someone expresses in some meaningful way? Let’s just brush them off.

How do you respond to no worries?

Here are a few more ways to say “You’re welcome” in English.You got it.Don’t mention it.No worries.Not a problem.My pleasure.It was nothing.I’m happy to help.Not at all.More items…•

Is it rude to not say you’re welcome?

It is not rude not to say “you’re welcome” after a compliment. When “thank you” is the initiating phrase, your response should be “you’re welcome” or any substitute of that which seems most appropriate; however, when the initiating phrase is a compliment, “you’re welcome” becomes the response.

Why shouldn’t you say you’re welcome?

When you do a favor, and someone says “thank you,” the automatic response is “you’re welcome.” It’s a basic rule of politeness, and it signals that you accept the expression of gratitude—or that you were happy to help. But according to one leading psychologist, this isn’t the best choice of words.

Why do Millennials say no problem?

“No problem,” however, is used because younger people feel not only that helping or assisting someone is a given and expected but also that it should be stressed that you’re need for help was no burden to them (even if it was).